Is the incomer breaker in your system tripping often??

Is the incomer breaker in your system tripping often??
Load Flow Analysis Protective Device Coordination Short Circuit Study System Studies & Simulations

Is the incomer breaker in your system tripping often??

95-97% of Engineering and Maintenance departments reset the breaker on experiencing tripping. That surely helps them continue the production and minimize the losses but that doesn’t bring a permanent solution to the problem of often tripping.

An incoming breaker trips when there is an electrical fault or overload in the electrical system. The breaker is designed to protect the electrical system by automatically tripping and cutting off the power supply to prevent damage to appliances, wiring, or a potential fire.

Before talking about the solution let’s look at the possible causes of tripping –

Here are some of the common reasons why an incoming breaker may trip:

1. Improper protective device coordination

When protective devices are not coordinated correctly, it can result in two or more devices attempting to operate simultaneously or in the wrong sequence, leading to breaker tripping. For example, if a downstream protective device, such as a fuse or circuit breaker, has a lower current rating than an upstream device, such as a circuit breaker or relay, the downstream device may trip first during a fault condition, even though the fault is located upstream. This can cause unnecessary downtime and equipment damage.

2. Thermal and Electric Overload:

This happens when the current flowing through the circuit exceeds the rating of the breaker.

Thermal overloading occurs when the current flowing through the circuit is sustained at a level that exceeds the thermal capacity of the conductors or equipment. This can result in the equipment overheating and damaging or even melting, leading to a fire hazard.

Electrical overloading occurs when the current flowing through the circuit is higher than the rated capacity of the breaker. This can be caused by various factors, such as short circuits, ground faults, or a sudden increase in demand for power. In such cases, the breaker will trip to interrupt the flow of current and prevent further damage.

3. Short circuit:

A short circuit can result in breaker tripping when the current flowing through the circuit exceeds the rated capacity of the circuit breaker. A short circuit occurs when there is a low resistance connection between two conductors of different phases or between a phase and ground. This connection allows a large amount of current to flow through the circuit, which can cause damage to the equipment or even pose a fire hazard.

4. Ground Fault

A ground fault occurs when a conductor comes in contact with the ground, or a conductive object is in contact with the ground. This can cause a large amount of current to flow through the circuit, which can damage the equipment or pose a fire hazard.

5. Ageing electrical system:

This happens due to wear and tear corrosion, and insulation degradation. As electrical equipment ages, it may no longer be able to function correctly, leading to malfunctions that can cause tripping.

Improper maintenance of electrical equipment can also contribute to the ageing process and lead to tripping. Lack of cleaning, lubrication, and regular inspection can cause electrical equipment to deteriorate more quickly, resulting in increased tripping.

If your incoming breaker trips frequently, it is best to call a qualified electrician to inspect your electrical system and identify the underlying cause for mitigation.

Check – Steps to take once the tripping has taken place.

 

 

 

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